The Truth About Demerit Points: How they work and how they are applied.


Demerit points are added to your driver’s licence, if you are convicted of breaking certain driving laws. The rules are different depending on if you are a new driver or have a full licence. This information will explain how the demerit points system works.

How demerit points work

You don’t “lose” demerit points on your driving record. You start with zero points and gain points for being convicted of breaking certain traffic laws.

Demerit points stay on your record for two years from the offence date. If you collect enough points, you can lose your driver’s licence.

You can also get demerit points on your Ontario’s driver’s licence when you violate driving laws in:

  • other Canadian provinces and territories

  • the State of New York

  • the State of Michigan

How demerit points are applied

The number of points added to your driving record depends on the offence. Here are the number of points that will be recorded for certain violations.

7 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • failing to remain at the scene of a collision

  • failing to stop when signaled or asked by a police officer

6 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • careless driving

  • racing

  • exceeding the speed limit by 50 km/hour or more

  • failing to stop for a school bus

5 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • failing to stop at an unprotected railway crossing (for bus drivers only)

4 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • exceeding the speed limit by 30 to 49 km/hour

  • following too closely

3 demerit points will be added if you are convicted of:

  • driving while holding or using a hand-held wireless communications or entertainment device

  • driving while viewing a display screen unrelated to the driving task

  • exceeding the speed limit by 16 to 29 km/hour

  • driving through, around or under a railway crossing barrier

  • driving the wrong way on a divided road

  • driving or operating a vehicle on a closed road

  • failing to yield the right-of-way

  • failing to obey a stop sign, traffic control stop/slow sign, traffic light or railway crossing signal

  • failing to obey the directions of a police officer